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boys-and-suicide:

weird-amphibious-dolphin:

kiei:

Super Mario vs Pacman by Unknown

This was a ride from beginning to end

This was so entertaining to watch

thetrainticket:

quietxdragon:

cassbones:

dear-sophia-count-me-in:

vworp-goes-the-tardis:

nerdjosh42:

Anastasia’s Blue Dress Appreciation Post

Was there some sort of special animation for this movie because it has never looked quite like other animation.

It was almost entirely rotoscoped, if that’s what you mean? That means it was drawn on top of live action film, which is how they got the realistic subtleties. 

Whoa, that’s so cool. Wow.

And this, ladies and gentlemen, is rotoscoping done fantastically right.

Because all you really need to do is find some cheap animation produced by lesser-to-completely-unknown studios to see how horribly disturbing rotoscoping is when the artist cannot animate very well; if the frame rate is too slow? It looks jerky, choppy, and repulsively unnatural. It leaps right into the uncanny valley and sets up house there.

(Hint, they are most likely talking about Ralph Bakshi)

With higher budgeted movies like this, the rotoscoping is NOT drawing directly over the live action references.  They are REFERENCES.  The animators still exaggerate and stretch out emotion/facial expressions etc. to give it a more cartoony-feel.  The rotoscoping is used to give it a sense of believability, and not every character has an LA reference.  For example, the mice from Cinderella 

Also, with Anastasia, I think like… 6 animators didn’t need the references because they were advanced enough.  But basically the process is they film the movie with actors in costume and then translate that to animation

You can see this on their DVD extras

Almost every 2D animated film (from bigger names) was rotoscoped - Cinderella, Alice in Wonderland, The Little Mermaid etc.  Even Bambi and The Lion King, the animators went out and studied how animals moved.  But otherwise people would notice the flaws in the movements, since we see humans everyday

 just for clarification’s sake, (i’m sleepy, forgive if this gets confusing) it shouldn’t really be called rotoscoping if they didn’t actually trace on top of the live footage frames. reference and rotoscoping are two different things, one is is just reference, the other is an actual animation technique.

those movies had rotoscoping in them, (i haven’t watched them in a long time) but were not completely rotoscoped. For particular scenes of dress twirling and general actions by classic princesses you’ll see they come off as flowy, delicate, or sort of weirdly smooth and restrained. Snow White, Cinderella, and Disney flicks into the 60s had rotoscoping but even then not everything was (at least with later ones to the best of my knowledge). the things that WERE rotoscoped were usually the princesses themselves - because they were supposed to be “soft” and “beautiful/ethereal”. going into the 80s and on, animation techniques had far surpassed those of the past decades, there was more freedom and experimentation, and an overall better understanding of animation itself. (everything started to have its own personality and style)

anyway, what i’m trying to get at (thru this haze of sleepiness) is that: rotoscoping in the past? very much a thing used for some if not for most of an animated film (featuring humans). rotoscoping now? very much a stylistic choice or as reference material, but if it’s just reference it’s not technically rotoscoping. for things like Bambi and TLK, live animals were brought in studio for reference, bc you can’t have animals act out the dramatic scenes you want lol. rotoscoping means to take footage and draw frame by frame drawings exactly on top of it. (with some frames taken out for movement style effects etc)

so i think you might be right in that Anastasia herself is not rotoscoped, but i believe her dress is, to help give it that soft/ethereal feel to it.

but actually now that i think about it, this movie had rotoscoping for some scenes, but what i think really makes it stand out as being animated so differently is the constant fps used. With the human characters (discounting Rasputin) there is never really a change in frame rate when they are moving quickly or during action sequences or anything. with more frames there is more for our brains to process and take in making it more “realistic” to us instead of seeming like a cartoon, which is a pretty rare thing for modern audiences to experience i think.

but yeah idk i would need to watch an in depth thing on this film to really see how much was rotoscoped, but i think it’s honestly just good animators and friggin patience that made this movie one of the more beautiful animated films i’ve seen.

de-rock-goddess:

tastefullyoffensive:

[via]

IVE NEVER DONE SO MUCH DAMAGE WITH ONE FINGER 

skunkandburningtires:

James Lopez is a veteran Disney animator (The Lion King, Pocahontas, Paperman) who is trying to raise funding for his primarily hand-drawn short film, Hullabaloo, with hopes of eventually finding a studio to fund a full-length version.

From the film’s IndieGo page:

Hullabaloo is the story of Veronica Daring, a brilliant young scientist who returns home from an elite finishing school to find her father—the eccentric inventor Jonathan Daring—missing without a trace! The only clue left behind points Veronica toward Daring Adventures, an abandoned amusement park used by her father to test his fantastical steam-powered inventions. There she discovers a strange girl named Jules, a fellow inventor who agrees to help Veronica in locating her missing father and discovering the secrets of his work.

In addition to helping save 2D animation, Hullabaloo aims to encourage girls to explore science and adventure. The film’s two protagonists are both young women and both scientists who use their intellect, wits, and courage to fight greed and corruption. We hope that Veronica Daring and her friend Jules will serve as positive role models for girls of all ages and encourage them to get excited about science, engineering, and sci-fi.

To see some footage and a short video pitch from Lopez, click here.

crofesima:

Cowboy Bebop the Movie: Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door opening animation by Hiroyuki Okiura (沖浦啓之) and Tetsuya Nishio (西尾鉄也)

amberblade:

Higher Sky- Eric Cheng-

animationtidbits:

The Book of Life - Trailer #2

moonanimate:

Enjoy. :)

iheartchaos:

Awesome gifset of the day: Aug(de)mented reality

thenoodlebooty:

luigigrivera:

i can’t stop laughting

This was an adventure

i-justreally-like-cats-okay:

Calming CAT!

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