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de-rock-goddess:

tastefullyoffensive:

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IVE NEVER DONE SO MUCH DAMAGE WITH ONE FINGER 

skunkandburningtires:

James Lopez is a veteran Disney animator (The Lion King, Pocahontas, Paperman) who is trying to raise funding for his primarily hand-drawn short film, Hullabaloo, with hopes of eventually finding a studio to fund a full-length version.

From the film’s IndieGo page:

Hullabaloo is the story of Veronica Daring, a brilliant young scientist who returns home from an elite finishing school to find her father—the eccentric inventor Jonathan Daring—missing without a trace! The only clue left behind points Veronica toward Daring Adventures, an abandoned amusement park used by her father to test his fantastical steam-powered inventions. There she discovers a strange girl named Jules, a fellow inventor who agrees to help Veronica in locating her missing father and discovering the secrets of his work.

In addition to helping save 2D animation, Hullabaloo aims to encourage girls to explore science and adventure. The film’s two protagonists are both young women and both scientists who use their intellect, wits, and courage to fight greed and corruption. We hope that Veronica Daring and her friend Jules will serve as positive role models for girls of all ages and encourage them to get excited about science, engineering, and sci-fi.

To see some footage and a short video pitch from Lopez, click here.

crofesima:

Cowboy Bebop the Movie: Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door opening animation by Hiroyuki Okiura (沖浦啓之) and Tetsuya Nishio (西尾鉄也)

amberblade:

Higher Sky- Eric Cheng-

animationtidbits:

The Book of Life - Trailer #2

moonanimate:

Enjoy. :)

iheartchaos:

Awesome gifset of the day: Aug(de)mented reality

thenoodlebooty:

luigigrivera:

i can’t stop laughting

This was an adventure

i-justreally-like-cats-okay:

Calming CAT!

starberry-cupcake:

Despite the surge in female protagonists in film and TV, the truth is women made up only 16% of employees on the top 250 films in 2013. Despite the depressing numbers, women are still making their mark. 

Carrie Tupper wrote a fantastic two-part article on The Mary Sue called The History of Women in Animation (which you can read here and here) and I illustrated here some of the amazing ladies mentioned there. 

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